<br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div>Hello again,</div><div><br></div><div>Adam was saying:</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">It seems to me that there are some wonderful opportunities to transform the texture of books even within a linear container because of open production models enabled by the web. Yet there are many, academics being near the top of the list, that shoot down the idea of open book production.<br>
<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>i find it really interesting to approach this from the point of view of investigating onto the &quot;texture of books&quot;, where this term might benefit from a series of different definitions/interpretations.</div>
<div>A wide array of examples are available in history about collaborative writing, emergent narratives, remixing, mashing-up, multi-authorship etc.</div><div>What really changes is the &quot;feeling&quot; of it, the process, the life-cycle, the &quot;life&quot; of it, as the process of writing/discussing/communicating/disseminating/reading/writing becomes a new process, more complex and more simple at the same time, transforming the &quot;book&quot; (let&#39;s still call it that way) into a &quot;(realtime, continuous) live space&quot;.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Salvatore</div><div><a href="http://www.artisopensource.net">http://www.artisopensource.net</a></div><div><a href="http://www.fakepress.it">http://www.fakepress.it</a></div></div>