<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Dear &lt;&lt;empyreans&gt;&gt;, <br>
    <br>
    there is an image that keeps coming back to me in regard to the
    exhumations and the missing from Ariel Dorfman's <i>Widows</i>, a
    book with only one image in it: the black-clad women standing beside
    the river claiming the corpses as they float down it into the
    village and wash ashore: Yes! Yes! That is my husband! That is my
    brother! That is my son! <br>
    <br>
    Another text of Dorfman's that this discussion has brought to mind
    is his long essay in <i>Some Write to the Future</i> on testimonial
    literature. The title of this book of essays further recalls Robert
    Bola&ntilde;o's future: <i>2666</i>. The overwhelming litany of the lost
    in book 4, <i>The Part About the Crimes</i>. It is a monument built
    out of repetition, as effective and affecting in its way as the
    Holocaust-Mahnmal in Berlin, by Peter Eisenman.<br>
    <br>
    It is perhaps interesting to note the difference in these two
    structures and that of the different 'cities' from which they came.
    Bringing us back to the future written but never arriving, like its
    people, missing.<br>
    <br>
    Best,<br>
    <br>
    Simon Taylor<br>
    <br>
    <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.squarewhiteworld.com">www.squarewhiteworld.com</a><br>
    <br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>