<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">And after all this debate about screens, it seems like the interface had the final word.<div>Thank you all for the exciting discussion and insightful comments, they've all been really inspiring for a student like me!</div><div><br></div><div>All the best</div><div>Laura</div><div><br><div><div>On 1 Aug 2012, at 17:42, Renate Ferro wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>Thanks Tim for thanking Simon and all of his guests this month for<br>such a robust discussion on the broad notion of screens. &nbsp;Tim and I<br>would like to remind all empyreans that during the month of August<br>empyre will be going off line.<br><br>Yes indeed in September Patrick Lichty will welcome us to a new era of<br>empyre with a brand new design interface that is promising to be a bit<br>more interactive. &nbsp;We have a team of students from Cornell that have<br>been working on the template for the past six months and we are hoping<br>that by the time the beginning of September comes that all of the<br>kinks will be worked out.<br><br>Best to all of you. &nbsp;Renate<br><br>On Wed, Aug 1, 2012 at 12:28 PM, Timothy Conway Murray &lt;<a href="mailto:tcm1@cornell.edu">tcm1@cornell.edu</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Hey, all, long before my days with -empyre-, I happened to pen my first book on early modern theatre politics, design, and perspective: Theatrical Legitimation: Allegories of Genius in England and France (Oxford 1987) and followed that with a discussion of counter perspectives in both Shakespeare and contemporary performance and art in: Drama Trauma: Specters of Race and Sexuality in Performance, Video, and Art (Routledge, 1997). &nbsp;Hope these texts might be helpful to any of you interested in returning to the early modern genealogy of the performative screen.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">I want to thank Simon Biggs for generating and overseeing such a lively month on -empyre-. &nbsp;Since Renate's deep in concentration on the screens in her studio, I might take the opportunity to welcome all empyreans a happy holiday season as we take a break for August. &nbsp;Renate will announce the new season later in the month.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Happy rest, sun, and pleasure to all. &nbsp;We hope you enjoy the calm in your -empyre- mailbox for the month.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">All my best,<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Tim<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Co-Managing Moderator, -empyre-<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">___________________<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">From: <a href="mailto:empyre-bounces@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au">empyre-bounces@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au</a> [<a href="mailto:empyre-bounces@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au">empyre-bounces@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au</a>] on behalf of Sean Cubitt [<a href="mailto:sean.cubitt@unimelb.edu.au">sean.cubitt@unimelb.edu.au</a>]<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2012 12:19 PM<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">To: soft_skinned_space<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Subject: Re: [-empyre-] split screens<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Erkki will know far more about this but here's a thought about the western tradition in theatre design: Check Palladio's designs for the grand baroque theatre the Teatro Olimpico at Vicenza (<a href="http://www.teatrolimpicovicenza.it/en.html">http://www.teatrolimpicovicenza.it/en.html</a>)<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Palladio's theatre is really only fully and perfectly visible from one seat.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">The melodramatic stage of the Victorians restored the baroque special effect (deus ex machine) in democratic form: everyone was to have the best seat in the house - but the best seat was modelled on the one Palladio designed for the Sovereign<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">The counter history – from mystery plays on carts through the wooden 'O' of the elizabethans to Brecht's apron and Boal's breakdown of the threshold between scene and audience – is almost impossible to meld with the spectacular tradition.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">This might account for the oddity of Danny Boyle's Olympic spectacular: you had to be in it to appreciate it, even though it was necessarily designed for television<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">The illusion machines of sport: well yes: sport as spectacle, but not what they buried under the spectacular architecture of the olympic park: hackney marshes, the largest aggression of football pitches anywhere in the world, and in my time in the east End packed every weekend with teams of amateur footballers<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Its like dancing: why on earth watch when you could be doing it yourself<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">s<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">On 1 Aug 2012, at 14:39, Johannes Birringer wrote:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">dear all<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">Simon rejects an aside I made that (in reference to Erkki Huhtamo's essay "Elements of Screenology:<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">Toward an Archaeology of the Screen", which the author asked us to read) was probably done more or<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">less tongue in cheek, hoping to get into a conversation with Erkki here, and it was in fact a reference<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">to Erkki's writing and his interesting examination of Asian traditions of shadow theatre ( and one<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">could include the Bunraku puppet theatre, which Brecht also studied as he sought to draw some techniques<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">from it for his own distanciation effects).<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">[31] However, in some traditions, like the the Wayang beber on Bali, part of the audience sits on the<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">sides, giving some spectators an opportunity to observe both the performers and the performance on<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">the screen. Theoretically the existence of this “double-point-of-view”, which can be encountered<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">elsewhere as well, is highly interesting. In Western traditions it was usually denied<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">I was trying to ask why Erkki thought the double point of view was usually denied in<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">the largely illusionist theatre and cinema traditions in the West, or what we think we can<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">learn from the older screen technologies researched in the essay cited above. And yes<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">it was a question directed at what Simon calls the "staid complacency of generic<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">classical theatre" and, in extension, the illusion machines of cinema and television<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">and sports, not excluding the gaming cultures. Other delusions machines are in<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">daily operation too (advertising, beauty industry production, social media revolution,<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">"the problematisations of academic art", etc), but you are probably right in arguing there's nothing wrong<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">with them under given economic and cultural conditions.<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">with regards<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">Johannes Birringer<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">Simon schreibt<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">I've enjoyed this month, but I would like to reject utterly the<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">implication in Johannes's question, that something "went wrong in<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">western traditions" ("What went wrong in western traditions?" 27/07/12),<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">and also the negativity that has characterised some of the posts<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">throughout this month. For example: ..."so perhaps screens are not<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">everywhere. There is hope." (Simon Biggs, 30/7/12)<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">For the first issue, that there is something wrong with western<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">traditions - which ones? - wanting to sustain the illusion rather than<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">pierce it or enjoy the complementary halves of a fore-screen and a<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">behind-the-scenes look at... wait a moment, isn't this the same west<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">which puts out behind-the-scenes featurettes as promotional material?<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">selling these to networks cheap to encourage audiences to fork out for<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">the next blockbuster at the cinema?<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">Behind-the-scenes has developed its own industry, multiplying genres and<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">compounding or laminating illusion and reality.<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">My experience of Brecht - also mentioned "Brecht would be pleased" in<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">Johannes's post - is a Verfremdung from the staid complacency of generic<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">classical theatre, things moving in an off-kilter way made even funnier,<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">farcier (and faster) for the return of the backstage repressed and its<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">plays of scale, toy-cars for example where a real car won't fit.<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">If the Platonic dialectic of real/copy persists it is (as I said<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">earlier) as an ultimately unsustainable resource fuelling the<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">problematisations of academic art.<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">_______________________________________________<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">empyre forum<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><a href="mailto:empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au</a><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><a href="http://www.subtle.net/empyre">http://www.subtle.net/empyre</a><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">_______________________________________________<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre forum<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><a href="mailto:empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au</a><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><a href="http://www.subtle.net/empyre">http://www.subtle.net/empyre</a><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">_______________________________________________<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre forum<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><a href="mailto:empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au</a><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><a href="http://www.subtle.net/empyre">http://www.subtle.net/empyre</a><br></blockquote><br><br><br><br>--<br><br>Renate Ferro<br>Visiting Assistant Professor of Art<br>Cornell University<br>Department of Art, Tjaden Hall Office #420<br>Ithaca, NY &nbsp;14853<br>Email: &nbsp;&nbsp;&lt;<a href="mailto:rtf9@cornell.edu">rtf9@cornell.edu</a>&gt;<br>URL: &nbsp;<a href="http://www.renateferro.net">http://www.renateferro.net</a><br> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.privatesecretspubliclies.net">http://www.privatesecretspubliclies.net</a><br>Lab: &nbsp;<a href="http://www.tinkerfactory.net">http://www.tinkerfactory.net</a><br><br>Managing Co-moderator of -empyre- soft skinned space<br><a href="http://empyre.library.cornell.edu/">http://empyre.library.cornell.edu/</a><br>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empyre<br>_______________________________________________<br>empyre forum<br>empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au<br>http://www.subtle.net/empyre<br></div></blockquote></div><br><div apple-content-edited="true">
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Futura">LAURA LOTTI</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Futura"><a href="mailto:laulotti@gmail.com">laulotti@gmail.com</a></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Futura">07506286624</font></div><div><br></div></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline">
</div>
<br></div></body></html>