<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">I would love to get in touch with them, if you think possible.<div><div>This has been and continues to be my main project (in other cities as well) since last year and it would be interesting to consider a collaboration with them, should they be interested.</div><div>I &nbsp;feel a deep connection to your writing Ana by the way.</div><div>Monika<br><div><div>On Oct 5, 2012, at 8:53 AM, Ana Valdés wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>A group of friends of mine, the architect group Hackitectura,<br><a href="http://www.hackitectura.net">www.hackitectura.net</a><br>work with maps and try to make a cartography of the memory (or the<br>lack of it) mapping social relations, inmaterial networks, political<br>issues.<br>One of their main pillars is the work with communities wanting to<br>recover the hidden stories of the cities, the place where the real<br>estate or the market converge with the lives of the people living<br>there. Your remarks about the real state and the commerce and<br>corporate world reminds me about the debate on gentrification and it's<br>consequences. With gentrification the stories of the people are<br>erased, shiny new white surfaces substitute the cracks of the fabric,<br>the holes in the walls, the peeled tiles, the age, the wrinkles of the<br>skin.<br>Ana<br><br>On Fri, Oct 5, 2012 at 9:52 AM, Monika Weiss &lt;gniewna@monika-weiss.com&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote type="cite">Today is the real estate and the commerce and the corporate world--- memory<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">of a city does not constitute a value, unless it's a negative value, because<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">it becomes a threat to the powers.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Nationalism of any kind does not interest me. Instead, is the redefinition<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">of otherness as sameness.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">I grew up seeing an empty square of ground located centrally in my own city<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">of Warsaw, which used to be a royal castle. &nbsp;After 1945 Soviets prevented<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Poland from rebuilding the castle, so that there was no national monument to<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">speak of. But in the seventies, when the entire city was up and rebuild from<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">zero to its simulacrum (as you know Germans reduced entire Warsaw to an<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">ocean of rubble by systematically exploding and burning all buildings and<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">bridges while Soviets watched this spectacle from the other side of a a very<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">narrow river of Vistula, during Warsaw Uprising in August 1944) -- When I<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">was growing up in seventies the rubble, gray like our grand zero in 2001,<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">created a stark contrast to the rest of the city, a reverse monument, a<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">whole, a living wound.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">On Oct 5, 2012, at 7:41 AM, Ana Valdés wrote:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Beautiful text, Monika! When I was a child (I was a very precocius<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">reader :) and read history of Rome and Greece. My favorite was the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">history of Carthage and I was shocked how the city was erased and the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Romans threw salt in it to avoid the Carthagineses should build it<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">again.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">These horrible fate of a city was a nightmare for me and I asked my<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">grandfather if our city could have the same fate and my grandfather<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">tranquilized me, it happened in the old times, nothing similar could<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">happen now.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">But he was wrong and he wanted spare me the grief, of course.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">I visited the city of Guernica in Spain some years ago and I tried to<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">imagine the eerie atmosphere of the city when the fascist bombs fell<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">over the city.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">It was these atmosphere the thing Picasso tried to paint in his painture.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">I searched the city of Guernica trying to evoke the day when the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">city's heart was ravaged.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">And what about the mourning today? It was a planted tree and a post<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">telling the day and the time of the attack. Nothing more.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Ana<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">On Fri, Oct 5, 2012 at 1:24 AM, Monika Weiss &lt;gniewna@monika-weiss.com&gt;<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">wrote:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">From a text I wrote about my current ongoing this year project "Shrouds".<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Do cities remember? Maps of cities are flat, yet their histories contain<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">vertical strata of events. Where in the topography and consciousness of a<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">city can we locate its memory? Maps of the Polish city Zielona Góra depict<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">an empty unmarked rectangular area located on Wrocławska Street, across from<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">the Focus Park shopping mall. Located centrally within the city this area<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">looks abandoned, being composed mostly of broken masonry and wood debris.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Inquiries to citizens of Zielona Góra indicate that many of them do not know<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">the history of this abandoned area, including those who grew up near the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">site.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Invited by a local museum to propose a project, I arrived to Zielona Góra<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">(Gruenberg) knowing of the past history of the unmarked yet centrally<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">located ruined site. On June 9th this year I flew on a small airplane to<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">film this territory and its surroundings. The flight marked the beginning of<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">my new project that will eventually develop into a film and a multi-layered<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">dialogue with the citizens of Zielona Góra. During the Second World War the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">site was a forced labor camp, which later became a concentration camp<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">designated primarily for Jewish women. The camp was developed on the site of<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">the German wool factory, Deutsche Wollenwaren Manufaktur AG, which supplied<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">the German war machine with military clothing. &nbsp;(It has since been converted<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">to a shopping mall.) &nbsp;During the war about 1,000 young women worked there as<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">seamstresses and eventually became prisoners of the concentration camp<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">complex governed by KZ Groß-Rosen. &nbsp;Towards the very end of the war the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">prisoners were sent on one of the most tragic of the forced Death Marches<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">where many of them died.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Looking down from the airplane we see well-kept buildings surrounding the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">ruins of the former camp, as though it were an open yet forgotten wound in<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">the body of the center of the city. During the performative phase of the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">project, I invited a group of young women from Zielona Góra to spend some<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">time in silence on the site of the camp, wearing black scarfs which later<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">were taken off and left behind amongst the ruins. Their presence evoked the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">absence of the prisoners. &nbsp;&nbsp;In the dual video projection installation at the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">BWA, (an exhibition that initiated the project in June), the faces of these<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">young women look towards us in silence. In another part of the projection we<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">observe a torso of a woman wrapping bandages onto her naked chest in a slow,<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">fragile gesture of defense, or perhaps caress. Her body stands for our<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">common body, anonymous as if it were a membrane between the self and the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">external world. Awareness of our marginality becomes elevated into the realm<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">of meaning through our brief encounter with memory and history.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">“Shrouds” considers aspects of public memory and amnesia in the construction<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">of the space of a city and its urban planning. As part of this project,<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">citizens of Zielona Góra are invited to propose how we choose to remember,<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">(or not) the women prisoners who perished there, and how this fulfilled the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">goals of a systematic destruction of an entire population. Over the course<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">of this year citizens of Zielona Gora are also invited to respond to a<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">questionnaire in order to propose their own ideas for the development of the<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">area, whether as a site of commemoration, or through other forms of<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">dialogue. Earlier this year, after over 50 years of gradual decay and<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">abandonment, the site has been sold by the city's officials to an<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">undisclosed developer. Yet the larger debate in Zielona Gora, a dialogue<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">about the site of the former camp and about the city's memory and amnesia,<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">as well as about the meaning of citizenship and response-ability shall<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">continue, to some extend, thanks to "Shrouds".<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150988884644656.448736.179396834655&amp;type=3<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150988885089656&amp;set=a.10150988884644656.448736.179396834655&amp;type=3&amp;theater<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://bwazg.pl/index.php?option=com_content&amp;task=view&amp;id=1455&amp;Itemid=46<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">_______________________________________________<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre forum<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.subtle.net/empyre<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">--<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://writings-escrituras.tumblr.com/<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://maraya.tumblr.com/<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.twitter.com/caravia158<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.scoop.it/t/art-and-activism/<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.scoop.it/t/food-history-and-trivia<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.scoop.it/t/gender-issues/<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.scoop.it/t/literary-exiles/<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.scoop.it/t/museums-and-ethics/<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.scoop.it/t/urbanism-3-0<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.scoop.it/t/postcolonial-mind/<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">cell Sweden +4670-3213370<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">cell Uruguay +598-99470758<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">will always long to return.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">— Leonardo da Vinci<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">_______________________________________________<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre forum<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.subtle.net/empyre<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">M o n i k a &nbsp;&nbsp;W e i s s &nbsp;&nbsp;S t u d i o<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">456 Broome Street, 4<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">New York, NY 10013<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Phone: 212-226-6736<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Mobile: 646-660-2809<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">www.monika-weiss.com<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">gniewna@monika-weiss.com<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">M o n i k a &nbsp;&nbsp;W e i s s<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Assistant Professor<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Graduate School of Art &amp; Hybrid Media<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Sam Fox School of Design &amp; Visual Arts<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Washington University in St. Louis<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Campus Box 1031<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">One Brookings Drive<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">St. Louis, MO 63130<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">mweiss@samfox.wustl.edu<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://samfoxschool.wustl.edu/portfolios/faculty/monika_weiss<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">_______________________________________________<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre forum<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">http://www.subtle.net/empyre<br></blockquote><br><br><br>-- <br>http://writings-escrituras.tumblr.com/<br>http://maraya.tumblr.com/<br>http://www.twitter.com/caravia158<br>http://www.scoop.it/t/art-and-activism/<br>http://www.scoop.it/t/food-history-and-trivia<br>http://www.scoop.it/t/gender-issues/<br>http://www.scoop.it/t/literary-exiles/<br>http://www.scoop.it/t/museums-and-ethics/<br>http://www.scoop.it/t/urbanism-3-0<br>http://www.scoop.it/t/postcolonial-mind/<br><br>cell Sweden +4670-3213370<br>cell Uruguay +598-99470758<br><br><br>"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth<br>with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you<br>will always long to return.<br>— Leonardo da Vinci<br>_______________________________________________<br>empyre forum<br>empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au<br>http://www.subtle.net/empyre</div></blockquote></div><br><div>
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; font-variant: small-caps; ">M o n i k a &nbsp; W e i s s &nbsp; S t u d i o</span></font></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>456 Broome Street, 4</span></font></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>New York, NY 10013</span></font></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>Phone: 212-226-6736</span></font></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>Mobile: 646-660-2809</span></font></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br><a href="http://www.monika-weiss.com">www.monika-weiss.com</a></span></font></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; font-size: 16px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br><a href="mailto:gniewna@monika-weiss.com">gniewna@monika-weiss.com</a>&nbsp;</span></font></span></div></div></span></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; "><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; font-variant: small-caps; ">M o n i k a&nbsp;&nbsp; W e i s s</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; font-variant: small-caps; "><br></span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; ">Assistant Professor</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>Graduate School of Art &amp; Hybrid Media</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>Sam Fox School of Design &amp; Visual Arts&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>Washington University in St. Louis&nbsp;</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>Campus Box 1031&nbsp;</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>One Brookings Drive&nbsp;</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br>St. Louis, MO 63130&nbsp;</span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br><a href="mailto:mweiss@samfox.wustl.edu">mweiss@samfox.wustl.edu</a></span></font><font face="Calibri" size="1" color="windowtext"><span style="font-size: 8pt; "><br><a href="http://samfoxschool.wustl.edu/portfolios/faculty/monika_weiss">http://samfoxschool.wustl.edu/portfolios/faculty/monika_weiss</a></span></font></span></div></div></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></div></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline">
</div>
<br></div></div></body></html>