<html><body><div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff; font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><div style="RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto">Hi,</SPAN></div>
<div style="RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto"></SPAN>&nbsp;</div>
<div style="RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto">I'd like to&nbsp;weave several&nbsp;threads together in this discussion.&nbsp; Writing is, at its bones, a way to communicate our experience and feel others--understanding and knowing a comfort in shared experiences--or relating our experiences of pain and suffering to others.&nbsp; Do multi-media tools (locative art for city memories, videos, merging) bring another level of connections to the readers/writers/communities? How do these elements work in ways paper may not be able to emulate?</SPAN></div>
<div style="RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto"><VAR id=yui-ie-cursor></VAR></SPAN>&nbsp;</div>
<div style="RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto">Ana wrote:</SPAN></div>
<div style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent; FONT-STYLE: normal; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; COLOR: rgb(0,0,0); FONT-SIZE: 16px; RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto">The common of our fate gave me the distance and the tools to write about my own experience, not with the aim to resalt my own but with<BR>the humble goal to make literature of those memories, to rise them from the testimonial level to the literary level.</SPAN></div>
<div style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent; FONT-STYLE: normal; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; COLOR: rgb(0,0,0); FONT-SIZE: 16px; RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto"><BR>&nbsp;</div></SPAN>
<div style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent; FONT-STYLE: normal; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; COLOR: rgb(0,0,0); FONT-SIZE: 16px; RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto">Monica wrote:</SPAN></div>
<div style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent; FONT-STYLE: normal; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; COLOR: rgb(0,0,0); FONT-SIZE: 16px; RIGHT: auto"><SPAN style="RIGHT: auto">I think of Lament also as a form,incantation, return, calling, echoing, hence my use of Lament's ABA format. The pollution that happens when the two worlds cross and merge, then and now, dead and alive. I think of Lament as enunciation and as anamnesis, also as a direct sibling of historical memory which, when real and subversive, is capable of undoing power, to some extent. That's why my work has been gradually [over the last 10 years or so] moving towards a focus on the idea of a City, specifically City's memory and City as a martyr (more about this later...)<BR><BR>So yes, lamentation is a critique that serves towards community self-constitution, where the boundary between lamentation lamentations becomes fluid and reversible.<BR><BR>&nbsp;Charles Baldwin
 wrote:<BR>I suppose I wonder now on what conditions can I say "I feel your pain." Is this phrase even possible? But also, we say it and mean it. (It would be interesting to pursue "I feel your pleasure" as well, which would be different, though present some related issues.) "I feel your pain" is indexical"; a moan is ikonic; we're thinking through the language of ikons here. (Alan? Sandy?) <BR><BR style="RIGHT: auto"></div></SPAN>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<div style="RIGHT: auto">Deena Larsen<BR>http://www.deenalarsen.net<A href="http://www.scoop.it/t/postcolonial-mind/" target=_blank>http://www.scoop.it/t/postcolonial-mind/</A><BR><BR><BR></div></div></body></html>