<html><head><base href="x-msg://163/"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Jon,<br><div><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div ocsi="x"><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; direction: ltr; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; "><div dir="ltr"><font face="times new roman"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><div>&gt;In any case, when one of my&nbsp;former colleagues at UW's HITLab discovered that</div><div>&gt;VR was<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span><i>as effective as opioids</i>&nbsp;for people who suffered 3rd degree burns,</div><div>&gt;I was compelled to return. (Videogames don't come close.)</div><div><font face="times new roman"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><font face="times new roman">this is extraordinary.</font></div><div><font face="times new roman">What kind of VR was it? and did it work for other pains -chronic or accute</font></div></div></div></div></span></blockquote><i>SnowWorld.</i>&nbsp;Lots of papers, mostly in science journals.&nbsp;</div><div>It is for ACUTE pain only.</div><div>Besides a group at a military base in Hawaii who seem not to be pursuing it any longer,&nbsp;</div><div>we are the first group to develop VR for&nbsp;CHRONIC PAIN -- the two are very, very different.&nbsp;</div><div>Acute pain is a symptom, chronic pain is a disease.</div><div>Pain distraction won't work for chronic pain,&nbsp;for obvious reasons, so my paradigm is very different as well.</div><div><br></div><div><i>SnowWorld</i>&nbsp;is immersive VR (HMD version), based on the notion of pain distraction.</div><div>The immersants travel down a kind of river, mostly in an ice cave. There are flying fish,</div><div>a mastadon, and snowmen (men). Immersants use a mouse (they are often using VR while</div><div>in a cold bath, so there are definite limitations) to shoot snowmen, who shatter.</div><div>Yes, most people have an issue with shooting snowmen.</div><div><br></div><div>The first version was more-or-less like skiing -- it's evolved over the last 10 years.</div><div>The HITLab was almost all computer scientists and engineers -- Peter Oppenheimer was the&nbsp;</div><div>only other artist at the HITLab (Human Interface Technology Lab)&nbsp;at the University of Washington.&nbsp;</div><div>It took me forever to convince most of the people there that&nbsp;the KIND of virtual environment&nbsp;</div><div>and interaction <i>mattered.</i>&nbsp;At the time, most of the work focused&nbsp;on phobias, so I tried to show&nbsp;</div><div>them that a photo-realistic spider (for arachnophobia) was&nbsp;very different from a Disney-like spider, etc.</div><div>For the context of burn patients, similarly, I argued that a cold looking and sounding&nbsp;VE would&nbsp;</div><div>make a difference. To this day, most still don't think that these things matter, porbably because</div><div>it can't be easily measured in scientific tests.</div><div>So my group is conducting a scientific study comparing SnowWorld with a volcano world</div><div>(same terrain). Think of it as an inverse "Sokal affair" :-)</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div ocsi="x"><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; direction: ltr; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; "><div><div><br></div><div>&gt;Currently, I organized and direct a group of researchers&nbsp;</div><div><font face="times new roman">are there publications, or places where we can read about this research?</font></div></div></div></div></span></blockquote>Yes. Our papers are in many diverse disciplines tho.</div><div>There have been a few short papers at ISEA, and an exhibit at UCLA last fall,</div><div>but we have a <i>Leonardo</i>&nbsp;paper ready to submit.</div><div>You may be able to a sense by checking out the confrontingpain URL in my contact info</div><div>at bottom.</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div ocsi="x"><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; direction: ltr; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; "><div><div><br></div><div><b>&gt;question</b></div><div>&gt;I'm interested in what constitutes the virtual -- is the term useful?&nbsp;</div><div><font face="times new roman"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><font face="times new roman">My argument is that it is not... but that is still coming.</font></div><div><font face="times new roman"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><font face="times new roman">Certainly i have not seen uses of the term which are not embedded in magic</font></div></div></div></div></span></blockquote>Yes, though that itself seems interesting enough to explore.</div><div>Also, it seems to me that there is something about immersive VR experiences that persist.</div><div>Not all, to be sure. And it is obvious that training is an area where the effects persist.</div><div>But there is an aspect I can't yet articulate that seems to stick in one's teeth,</div><div>or to haunt in a powerful way, beyond hype or utopian fantasies or novelty . . . but that is still coming, as you say.</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div ocsi="x"><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; direction: ltr; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; "><div><div><font face="times new roman">that is in the idea of power that is not quite present</font></div></div></div></div></span></blockquote>Yes, exactly. And again, I think it may touch something that is beyond</div><div>novelty, or perhaps beyond the technological imaginary too.</div><div>More on this?</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div ocsi="x"><div style="direction: ltr; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; "><div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">&gt;As my niece would say, "you can't pee in VR" --&nbsp;that is, there are obvious limits, as there are with any media form.</div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">&gt;On the other hand, it can elicit or provoke perceptually intense responses, some&nbsp;of which persist.&nbsp;</div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font face="times new roman">Indeed, but pointing at Artaud again, so can theatre, so can movies, so can text, so can hypnosis.</font></div></div></div></div></span></blockquote>Yes, it is difficult to talk about peculiar characteristics of a media form without seeming to valorize it,</div><div>or without asserting that any media form can provoke. Just for the record, I think VR is as interesting</div><div>as other forms -- we also have a furry robot, for instance, that mitigates anxiety (a common sequelae of chronic pain)</div><div>better than VR. And what underlies my approach to VR for chronic pain is mindfulness meditation</div><div>(think neuroplasticity). In brief, the system I devised incorporates biofeedback, which changes</div><div>the visuals and sounds in real-time as patients learn how to meditate. Of course, technology</div><div>isn't necessary, but we found that it does help because (we think) it provides feedback, and</div><div>it tracks users' states. So it is related to affective computing, and of course I realize that it is impossible</div><div>to really measure many aspects of states and state changes. It's just an inference. But one that seems to work.</div><div><br></div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div ocsi="x"><div style="direction: ltr; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; "><div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font face="times new roman"></font>&nbsp;</div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font face="times new roman">Maybe so much of what we think is ourselves, depends upon one or two senses that when these are simulated or overwhelmed, we end up in different states.</font></div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font face="times new roman"></font>&nbsp;</div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font face="times new roman">As already noted, in terms of this theme, pain is very much one of those overwhelming sensations. It can become everything, or shut down everything as we avoid it.</font></div></div></div></div></span></blockquote>Yes, that's the biggest challenge of pain. Chronic pain too has many sequelae:</div><div>anger, depression, anxiety, insomnia, kinesiophobia, increasing immobility, social isolation.</div><div>Add to that the fact that conservatively, 1 in 5 people in industrialized countries are estimated</div><div>to have it, no one knows what causes it or what can cure it. Most people can't even wrap</div><div>their heads around the idea that pain can be a DISEASE (systemic disorder where the pain response</div><div>system "gets stuck" at a very high rate), let alone a degenerative one that kills -- eventually.<br><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div ocsi="x"><div style="direction: ltr; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 16px; "><div><div style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; "><font face="times new roman"></font></div></div></div></div></span></blockquote></div><div><br></div><div>The great thing about many pain doctors is that they realize they can't maintain</div><div>the usual categories, or medical protocols, so they are quite open to alternatives.</div><div>Also, the research demonstrates that the problem goes well beyond their abilities,</div><div>so many are open to experts from other fields. They just aren't familiar with what</div><div>others do though, and many experts forget that they have highly specific terms.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>But, for example, a standard (1 of 6) protocol for chronic pain self-management programs</div><div>is for patients to draw themselves. There are a lot of reasons for this -- the most important</div><div>three seem to be to help patients to express the inexpressible (i.e., to crawl back into the social realm),</div><div>to try to better communicate with them beyond the 6 minute visit,</div><div>and to not avoid what their pain is doing to them.&nbsp;</div><div>I won't use the term art therapy, and pain doctors don't either,&nbsp;mostly because they want&nbsp;</div><div>to maintain the value of expression and art instead of&nbsp;getting caught in specific ways to do that.</div><div><br></div><div>--------</div><div>Obviously, I'm motivated to be a keen lurker here. I'm also working on assembling the names of artists</div><div>and others who have chronic pain and whose work grapples with it in some way (Susan Leigh Star, for example),</div><div>so if anyone could contribute, I'd very much appreciate it.</div><div><br></div><div>Diane</div><br></body></html>