My thoughts exactly. Thank you Paolo for putting forward these questions. This type of game is really fascinating to me as I ask myself why players would commit themselves to the degree that you describe Ken.  It is rather remarkable given the busy schedules that people work with. Along these lines, I would like to hear more about the audiences that WWO, etc., attracts (in the context of &quot;I love bees&quot; [<a href="http://www.avantgame.com/ilovebees.htm">http://www.avantgame.com/ilovebees.htm</a>] I understand that the audiences were demarcated by the marketing goal of the game, but in case of WWO this is less clear to me, hence my question about the use of the game in educational settings, though it does seem that the audience for this game is broader?         <br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Mar 21, 2013 at 5:50 PM, paolo - molleindustria <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:paolo@molleindustria.it" target="_blank">paolo@molleindustria.it</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------<br>
<br>
I followed World Without Oil closely when it came out. It&#39;s a really fascinating experiment in roleplaying and Alternate Reality Games. I always wondered why, despite the significant media attention, there are so few examples of this kind.<br>

Since Ken is with us, I&#39;ll take the liberty to go into more specific designy issues.<br>
<br>
We are obviously talking about a different level of engagement and a different kind of model player here. These games typically ask a lot from the participants and require a certain predisposition and sustained commitment.<br>