<div dir="ltr">Hi Gaby,<div><br></div><div>Thanks for bringing up scale. This is one of the reasons that brought me to collaborate in the first place and I think one of the most powerful forces that bring people to work together. You can do more than you can alone. You can do things that you can&#39;t do otherwise. The social aspect, it&#39;s more fun to work with others than by yourself, was compelling for me as well. That fun should not be overlooked (as Renate is bringing up in another thread...); it has to do both with our social being-ness but also powerful ways of learning. In my past collaborations, primarily preemptive media, we worked side-by-side a lot of the time, learning from each other and learning through doing. We had our own specializations but over the years those lines blurred a lot. Division of labor, or factory style, helps to speed things up and cannot be dismissed altogether but I tell my students to not rely on that method solely because you will miss out. Collaborating is skill sharing. There is also the important role of the one not &quot;in the know&quot; who will most likely question assumptions and automatic ways of working that happen when have done something over and over again for a long time.</div>


<div><br></div><div>Also something that I came to realize after starting to collaborate was how important group work is as incubator for socially engaged or issue based projects. The work originates from conversation, debate, struggles, mutual aid -- not from a single perspective. </div>


<div><br></div><div>The corporatization of which you speak is pervasive. (I see it starkly in the language of grant writing these days.) The corporate world is very hierarchical and antithetical to what I describe above, but then so is academia. I try to counter it in my courses by replicating what I have found to be successful in my own work: bringing together disparate groups of people with differing skill sets (that is the leveler) but a common desire. In the specific class I mentioned before the common desire is to further the mission of the non-profits with which we work (hand picked by me). Most of the semester is reading, discussion, brainstorming, testing... the final production of the work is only the last couple of weeks. By emphasizing or making space for everything but the finished project I keep everyone in the space of experimenting and learning longer. There is time to learn each other&#39;s languages, work different angles, learn through doing, prototype, beta test, fail (...or not just make a company website for the organization who does not know how to build one!). It was interesting for me to see in the 3 groups that I worked with this term that only one resorted to a clear hierarchy where a student stepped into the role of the director. It&#39;s will of course be really interesting to see over the next decade how collaboration pro/regresses in cultural production and what it means to students who are digital natives, immersed 24/7 in social media and grow up with the mass marketed concept of sharing. </div>

<div><br></div><div style>Brooke </div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, May 22, 2013 at 6:22 PM, Gabriela VargasCetina <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:gabyvargasc@prodigy.net.mx" target="_blank">gabyvargasc@prodigy.net.mx</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>


<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------<br>


  
    
  
  <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div>Dear all,<br>
      <br>
      I am enjoying this discussion very much.  What I know of Brooke&#39;s
      work is very inspiring, and it is difficult to see how the scale
      or her projects would make them manageable by a single person, so
      the question group / individual becomes very relevant.<br>
      <br>
      I am an anthropologist and we have pretty much the same problems
      you have all been describing: the humanities and social sciences
      train students to work individually, and not together with other
      people.  Furthermore, it is very difficult to get an
      anthropologist to work with others from mixed training, including
      mathematicians and artists.  I have been allowed by our Faculty of
      Anthropology to put together courses where students have to dance
      or perform their theoretical concepts, or design
      anthropologically-meaningful websites using theories derived from
      fiction, always in teams.  However, many of my colleagues
      (especially at other universities) think this is all bizarre and
      nonsensical, and even the students think that they do not develop
      &#39;useful skills&#39; in my courses.  And yes, like art students, as per
      Ana&#39;s comment, anthropology students today are being told they
      should find ways to &#39;market&#39; themselves to corporations,
      individually, and follow instructions instead of questioning the
      world.  There is the job market problem, though: where will
      graduates from anthropology find employment, other than at the
      local branches of multi-national corporations?  I don&#39;t have any
      answers, but the fact that the questions are so difficult is sad
      and troubling.<br>
      <br>
      Gaby Vargas-Cetina<br>
      Facultad de Ciencias Antropologicas<br>
      Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan<br>
      <br>
      On 5/22/13 4:43 PM, Ana Valdés wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <pre>----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------</pre>
      <br>
      <fieldset></fieldset>
      <br>
      <div dir="ltr">Brooke I loved your rethoric question:<br>
        <br>
        <pre>I teach collaboration too and just a few days ago during final
presentations saw the power of bringing people together who do not know
each other well -- or at all-- for a common cause or, as Paul notes, shared
agendas. I pair groups of students to make media work for non-profit
organizations in Westchester, a pro-bono approach with a participatory
design bent. But I guess I am left wondering why collaboration is to this
day is still seen as unusual or something special in art practice and art
education and not the modus operandi? Now we are going to study
individuality ... the methods of and reasons for working alone!!

</pre>
        <pre>I agree totally with you and wonder why all artist educations
</pre>
        <pre>are headed to educate artists as &quot;entrepreneurs&quot;, as they were


</pre>
        <pre>heads of an unipersonal enterprise with only them as contracted.
</pre>
        <pre>I think that&#39;s the problem when you try to create the idea
</pre>
        <pre>artists and writers are &quot;professions&quot; as doctors, podologists,


</pre>
        <pre>architects, dentists or other.
</pre>
        <pre>The writing educations grow as swamps, the &quot;creative writing&quot; is now
</pre>
        <pre>an accepted part of the curriculum in many of the world&#39;s universities


</pre>
        <pre>but do we have seen the growing of a talented writing group
</pre>
        <pre>of people equivalent to all who are being educated as writers or
</pre>
        <pre>do we see the same amount of people writing without any


</pre>
        <pre>academical education?
</pre>
        <pre>My point is: we are evolving from the concept the artist or the writer
</pre>
        <pre>as gifted by God and part of an elite to another myth:
</pre>
        <pre>the artist or writer as part of a corporation, skilling them in


</pre>
        <pre>selling of their own works, marketing it and publishing it.

</pre>
        <pre>I think collaboration is nearly mandatory today if you want to make
changes and leave a trace in the world we live into.


</pre>
        <pre>Ana
</pre>
        <pre></pre>
        <br clear="all">
        <div><br>
          -- <br>
          <div dir="ltr">
            <div>http//<a href="http://congresomujeresdenegromontevideo.wordpress.com" target="_blank">congresomujeresdenegromontevideo.wordpress.com</a><br>
              <a href="http://www.twitter.com/caravia158" target="_blank">http://www.twitter.com/caravia158</a><span style="background-color:rgb(255,245,51);color:rgb(51,51,51);font-weight:bold;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-size:11px;line-height:11px;font-family:arial;text-align:center;padding:2px 3px 1px;margin:0px 0px 0px 1px;display:inline">60</span><span style="background-color:rgb(255,245,51);color:rgb(51,51,51);font-weight:bold;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-size:11px;line-height:11px;font-family:arial;text-align:center;padding:2px 3px 1px;margin:0px 0px 0px 1px;display:inline">60</span><span style="background-color:rgb(255,245,51);color:rgb(51,51,51);font-weight:bold;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-size:11px;line-height:11px;font-family:arial;text-align:center;padding:2px 3px 1px;margin:0px 0px 0px 1px;display:inline">60</span><span style="background-color:rgb(255,245,51);color:rgb(51,51,51);font-weight:bold;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-size:11px;line-height:11px;font-family:arial;text-align:center;padding:2px 3px 1px;margin:0px 0px 0px 1px;display:inline">60</span><span style="background-color:rgb(255,245,51);color:rgb(51,51,51);font-weight:bold;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-size:11px;line-height:11px;font-family:arial;text-align:center;padding:2px 3px 1px;margin:0px 0px 0px 1px;display:inline">60</span><span style="background-color:rgb(255,245,51);color:rgb(51,51,51);font-weight:bold;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-size:11px;line-height:11px;font-family:arial;text-align:center;padding:2px 3px 1px;margin:0px 0px 0px 1px;display:inline">60</span><br>



              <a href="http://www.scoop.it/t/art-and-activism/" target="_blank">http://www.scoop.it/t/art-and-activism/</a><br>
              <a href="http://www.scoop.it/t/food-history-and-trivia" target="_blank">http://www.scoop.it/t/food-history-and-trivia</a><br>
              <a href="http://www.scoop.it/t/urbanism-3-0" target="_blank">http://www.scoop.it/t/urbanism-3-0</a><br>
            </div>
            <br>
            <div><br>
              <br>
              cell Sweden <a href="tel:%2B4670-3213370" value="+46703213370" target="_blank">+4670-3213370</a><br>
              cell Uruguay <a href="tel:%2B598-99470758" value="+59899470758" target="_blank">+598-99470758</a><br>
              <br>
              <br>
              &quot;When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk
              the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you
              have been and there you will always long to return. <br>
              — Leonardo da Vinci
              <div>
              </div>
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
      <br>
      <fieldset></fieldset>
      <br>
      <pre>_______________________________________________
empyre forum
<a href="mailto:empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au" target="_blank">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au</a>
<a href="http://www.subtle.net/empyre" target="_blank">http://www.subtle.net/empyre</a></pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    <br>
    <pre cols="72">-- 
Gabriela Vargas-Cetina
Facultad de Ciencias Antropológicas
Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
Carretera a Tizimín km 1
Mérida, Yucatán 97305.  México
Tel. <a href="tel:%2B52%20999%20930%200090" value="+529999300090" target="_blank">+52 999 930 0090</a></pre>
  </div>

<br>_______________________________________________<br>
empyre forum<br>
<a href="mailto:empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au" target="_blank">empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au</a><br>
<a href="http://www.subtle.net/empyre" target="_blank">http://www.subtle.net/empyre</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div></div>