<div dir="ltr"><span style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">Hi everyone,</span><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">I&#39;ve enjoyed following the very interesting discussions that have appeared here....  I made a few contributions a while ago, but I&#39;ve been silent pretty much since then, pretty much due to some shyness....</div>
<div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">Anyway, here&#39;s my bio as well as a statement about my work.</div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">
<br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">Best wishes,<br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"><p>Joel<br></p><p><br></p><p>JOEL TAUBER</p><p>WORK DESCRIPTION &amp; BIO</p>
<p><a href="http://joeltauber.com/" target="_blank"><span style="color:windowtext;text-decoration:none">http://joeltauber.com</span></a></p><p> </p><p>Joel Tauber’s practice has led him through a series of rigorous personal investigations about mysticism, ethics, and the environment - that are poetic and often quixotic.   These research projects are presented as installations and films that are structured in ways that are designed to raise questions and offer cultural critiques in non-didactic ways.  Tauber spent two years trying to achieve enlightenment outside the confines of organized religion by inserting himself into holes in the ground. He spent another two years researching flight as a metaphysical tool and applying that research to his own pursuit of flight.  After unsuccessfully jumping off rocks while trying different mental and flapping strategies, Tauber managed to achieve his dream, flying 150 feet into the air for an hour and a half in a bagpipe-and-balloon-powered flying machine that he had constructed. Excited by the idea that music had helped him fly, Tauber spent the next couple of years exploring the ocean while scuba diving and translating his movements into music; this project culminated in a 3-channel video installation-cum-disco. The following five years were devoted to protecting and celebrating a forlorn and lonely sycamore tree that was stuck in a giant parking lot.  Tauber illegally installed (with a jackhammer) a metal fence around the tree; built giant earrings for the tree to celebrate its beauty; convinced the City to remove 400 square feet of asphalt around the tree and to protect it permanently with a ring of boulders; and planted 200 “tree baby” offspring throughout Southern California.  “Sick-Amour” was presented as a 12-channel video tree sculpture as well as a documentary film/love story.  His most recent project – “Pumping” - is a meditation on the birth of Los Angeles and how the Southern Pacific Railroad commandeered the City and exploited the oil and water resources in the region.  “Pumping” is both a short experimental film and an installation comprised of 3 video projections, 80 feet of train tracks, a giant metal “filmstrip”, 11 photographs, and a handcar sculpture.</p>
<p></p><p> </p><p>Joel Tauber received his MFA in art from Art Center College of Design and his BA in art history and sculpture from Yale University.  Tauber is an assistant professor of art at Wake Forest University, where he is developing their video art program.  His work has been shown in solo art exhibitions at a number of locations, including Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects in LA and Galerie Adamski in Berlin as well as Aachen, Germany.   He has been included in numerous group art exhibitions including the 2004 and 2008 California Biennials at the Orange County Museum of Art; &quot;The Gravity in Art&quot; at the De Appel Centre For Contemporary Art in Amsterdam; and &quot;Still Things Fall From the Sky&quot; at the California Museum of Photography. Film Festivals include the Sedona International Film Festival, San Francisco Documentary Festival, and the Downtown Film Festival - Los Angeles, where his movie, “Sick-Amour”, was awarded “Best Green Film.”  Tauber won the 2007 Contemporary Collectors of Orange County Fellowship and the 2007-2008 CalArts / Alpert Ucross Residency Prize for Visual Arts.  His project “Sick-Amour” was shortlisted for a 2011 International Green Award.  Tauber’s work has been featured in numerous media outlets, including National Public Radio, Deutsche Welle / Deutschlandfunk radio, NBC local news, the Ovation Network, Swedish Television, ArtReview Magazine, The Design Magazine, ArtWeek, artUS Magazine, The Pasadena Star News, and The Los Angeles Times.</p>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>Joel Tauber<br>Assistant Professor of Art<br>Video Art<br>Wake Forest University<br><a href="http://joeltauber.com" target="_blank">http://joeltauber.com</a><br>
<a href="mailto:joeltauber@gmail.com" target="_blank">joeltauber@gmail.com</a>
</div></div>