<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 12pt;
font-family:Calibri
}
--></style></head>
<body class='hmmessage'><div dir='ltr'><div data-emoji_font="true" style="font-family: Calibri, sans-serif, 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', Symbola, EmojiSymbols, 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', Symbola, EmojiSymbols !important;">I'd like to hear more from the practitioners on this, but a few thoughts in response to Rob.</div><div><br></div><div>First, while Twine is clearly part of a longer tradition of interactive fiction and hypertext, I don't really see how that constitutes a "recapitulation of the status quo." These have always been marginalized practices, and don't represent any kind of hegemonic force.</div><div><br></div><div>Second, the Twine new wave has been constituted in distinct communities of practice and reception from those early text-based gaming traditions. For the most part these are new artists are adopting these tools, and new audiences are being exposed to text-based games (thanks in part to the accessibility of the end product compared to a lot of earlier IF software). Kara's earlier post clearly demonstrated the value in this accessibility.</div><div><br></div><div>Third, I think it is insufficient to say that Twine games are "the same" as these earlier traditions or merely a "recapitulation". Sure, there are plenty of Twine games that operate in familiar IF genres (The Matter of the Great Red Dragon for example: http://fearoftwine.com/14.html), but the games that have become most strongly associated with the platform are weird, queer, honest, and experimental. In the broadest terms, these games may share the "forms" of earlier IF and hypertext, but their content is distinct and they have a specific aesthetic sensibility and political orientation.</div><div><br></div><div>Consider porpentine's Howling Dogs (http://aliendovecote.com/uploads/twine/howlingdogs/howlingdogs.html#2o) and HIGH END CUSTOMIZABLE SAUNA EXPERIENCE (http://aliendovecote.com/uploads/twine/sauna.html), or Merrit Kopas' Conversations With My Mother (http://mkopas.net/files/conversations/conversations.html), or Hannah Epstein's PsXXYborg (https://www.facebook.com/PsxxYborg), or Kara's recently-released Cyborg Goddess (http://cyborg-goddess.com). I could go on, but you get the idea. Why would we want to dismiss these weird and wonderful works? I wouldn't dismiss a new comic artist because she "recapitulates" the form of earlier comics. I am honestly confused.</div><div><br></div><div>Felan</div><br><div>&gt; Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 21:00:05 -0700<br>&gt; From: rob@robmyers.org<br>&gt; To: empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au<br>&gt; Subject: Re: [-empyre-] empyre Digest, Vol 112, Issue 23<br>&gt; <br>&gt; ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------<br>&gt; On 28/03/14 07:48 AM, Felan Parker wrote:<br>&gt; &gt; <br>&gt; &gt; Twine is a very different beast from Game Maker or Unity. <br>&gt; <br>&gt; It is. It is however not a very different beast from Storyscape. And its<br>&gt; users recapitulating the forms of 80s interactive fiction and 90s<br>&gt; interactive multimedia using it is a good example of my argument.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; - Rob.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; _______________________________________________<br>&gt; empyre forum<br>&gt; empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au<br>&gt; http://www.subtle.net/empyre<br></div>                                               </div></body>
</html>