<div dir="ltr">Hi Anna, and everyone;<div><br></div><div>Yours is a great question. Some colleagues of mine, though, have found the opposite -- where new technological innovations are frowned upon within more traditional academic musical and artistic spheres -- and have difficultly accessing grants and other kinds of committee-dependent resources. At the moment, I am studying the cultural history of MIDI, and am often surprised when I hear tell of digital instruments and tools viewed as somehow less legitimate than &#39;pen and pencil&#39; instruments. There are cases on either side of this argument: artists doing profoundly status-quo work with &quot;innovative&quot; technologies; and others expending what is possible with more traditional instruments. An example from the latter camp that comes to mind is <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9YJM2GCvk8&amp;feature=kp">Colin Stetson</a>, the Montreal-based horn player who makes unexpected and incredible noises with minimal technological intervention. Is Stetson&#39;s the kind of innovation you&#39;re hoping to see more of?</div>
<div><br></div><div>Best, Ryan</div><div><div><br></div>-- <br><a href="https://twitter.com/ryandiduck" target="_blank">@ryandiduck</a><br>
</div></div>