<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On 2014-06-26, at 2:59 PM, Lyn Goeringer wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">we are in a semi-fortunate age when even that is starting to happen in community and makers centers and no longer reliant entirely on higher education and tech schools to learn basic electronics.&nbsp;</span></blockquote><br></div><div>I think this is a very important point raised by Lyn. I led a study in Canada of women working in sound technologies (music, film soundtracks, theatre and museum sound, documentary production etc). In Canada, community and campus radio stations and artist-run centres have been founded across the country since the 70s. We found that 40% of the participants in the study had got their start working with sound technologies in community and campus radio stations, and many accessed equipment and technical support -- as well as solidarity -- from community artist-run centres as well.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Thanks for this stimulating discussion.</div><div>Andra McCartney</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><br></body></html>