<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 11/17/2014 10:18 AM, Alan Sondheim
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:alpine.NEB.2.00.1411171015320.17176@panix3.panix.com"
      type="cite">
      <br>
      On Mon, 17 Nov 2014, Christina Spiesel wrote:
      <br>
      <br>
      &nbsp;As testimony to the importance of feeling and the emotions as
      guides to value -- something very much devalued at the moment as
      humanities and arts budgets are slashed and education is
      increasingly thought of as training.
      <br>
      <br>
      -- Can you elaborate on this? This, in the United States, is a
      crisis of conscience and citizenry that is ongoing and worsening;
      humanities, arts, music, and even phys ed programs are being cut
      out of K-12 schools - not to mention artschools themselves, which
      are increasingly becoming vocational feeds for the tech
      industries. I do think this plays into our inordinate fear of
      ebola, our magnification of crISIS in general, and our deep
      ignorance of conflict and violence (although we practice both with
      impunity). Comments appreciated, and thanks, Alan
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">In response to Alan's request for
      elaboration, I can claim no great expertise.&nbsp; Last year I did do a
      presentation to a working group of which I am a member on
      electronic education initiatives. I knew how deeply this thrust&nbsp;
      has penetrated higher education when the director of the Woodrow
      Wilson Foundation (concerned with academic teaching and
      scholarship) wrote a newsletter saying that the Foundation had to
      get busy on the new paradigm so as not to be left behind. The
      efficiencies claimed for these higher education&nbsp; initiatives rest
      on broadcasting by professors to ever more students. In such a
      scenario, evaluation will, of necessity, be carried out through
      that which can be assessed quantitatively.( Claims made for
      successful machine grading of essays are misleading. Those
      programs can get at language but not at thinking. ) Critical
      thinking cannot emerge from choosing the right answer from a
      selection of options. There's a good parallel with problems with
      eye witness identification here.&nbsp; If a viewer is shown one
      candidate for perpetrator at a time, the results are more accurate
      because the viewer has to ruminate more on the qualities of that
      individual rather than when a whole line up is displayed whether
      through photographs or people viewed in a line.&nbsp; Have you ever
      seen a multiple choice set of questions where none of the
      questions was correct at all? ("None of the above" doesn't quite
      capture what I am getting at.)&nbsp; So cognitively, students in these
      programs will be engaged in learning the facts and finding an
      answer from a pre-selected series. (Here an autobiographical note
      -- I discovered during my college years that I could test better
      on exams where I actually knew less because I didn't get into the
      differentia that I would ponder when&nbsp; I actually knew something.)
      The arts and humanities and physical arts do not fit into machine
      learning; their "answers" require complexity unless it is just a
      factual test of names and dates or rules of the game, etc. I would
      guess that people who can see that there's something outside the
      closed systems of their educational opportunities but have no idea
      how to proceed must feel especial pain and powerlessness. And as I
      write that sad thought, I think about the vitality of DIY culture
      on the Internet.&nbsp; My grandkids (all under 12) thinking nothing of
      going to YouTube to find videos to teach them how to make things.<br>
      <br>
      There is another issue as well -- critical thinking itself is not
      valued. Or, maybe I should say, that for planners, that is the
      province of experts and not what a population needs as a whole.&nbsp;
      The kind of teaching that produces critical thinking is labor
      intensive -- it actually requires teachers who have real
      knowledge/preparation before they get to students and then
      students who can be responsive to inter generational
      conversations.<br>
      <br>
      Because I teach critical thinking, my greatest concern regarding
      on-line educational initiatives has to do with the fact that no
      matter what the software package is,&nbsp; its use is going to be
      backed up on servers and is, therefore, subject to surveillance.
      How can a teacher raise a hypothetical even if just to dubunk
      something without the fear that it may come back to haunt if not
      the teacher then the student? If we are not teaching the
      humanities how can we have any hope that our social systems will
      understand that questions of meaning are actually very complex?&nbsp;
      "Judgment" in these syetms rests on simple assessment of the
      presence of some datum. <br>
      <br>
      So I will toss in two links: this was on the front page of today's
      NY Times: <a
href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/17/us/groups-in-ferguson-prepare-for-grand-jury-decision.html?module=Search&amp;mabReward=relbias%3Ar%2C%7B%221%22%3A%22RI%3A7%22%7D&amp;_r=0">http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/17/us/groups-in-ferguson-prepare-for-grand-jury-decision.html?module=Search&amp;mabReward=relbias%3Ar%2C{%221%22%3A%22RI%3A7%22}&amp;_r=0


      </a><br>
      I believe that this is actually a very sophisticated use of
      representation as protest in Ferguson, Missouri.<br>
      <br>
      And also from the NYT, here's a retrospective look at a famous
      case and the role of media in it -- just 15 minutes long or so:&nbsp; <a
        class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
href="http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/100000003237187/a-dingos-got-my-baby-trial-by-media.html?emc=edit_th_20141117&amp;nl=todaysheadlines&amp;nlid=28688506">http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/100000003237187/a-dingos-got-my-baby-trial-by-media.html?emc=edit_th_20141117&amp;nl=todaysheadlines&amp;nlid=28688506</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;
The

      media has been busy trying to create the Ebola panic. Why?<br>
      <br>
      Finally, a generational problem has been created because parents
      of current students have not necessarily learned themselves. That
      said, there are pockets of wonderfulness around the country where
      parents have pressured the schools. In higher ed, there are still
      small liberal arts colleges but they are struggling for financial
      support.<br>
      <br>
      CS<br>
      <br>
      &nbsp;On 11/17/2014 10:18 AM, Alan Sondheim wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:alpine.NEB.2.00.1411171015320.17176@panix3.panix.com"
      type="cite"> <br>
      On Mon, 17 Nov 2014, Christina Spiesel wrote: <br>
      <br>
      &nbsp;As testimony to the importance of feeling and the emotions as
      guides to value -- something very much devalued at the moment as
      humanities and arts budgets are slashed and education is
      increasingly thought of as training. <br>
      <br>
      -- Can you elaborate on this? This, in the United States, is a
      crisis of conscience and citizenry that is ongoing and worsening;
      humanities, arts, music, and even phys ed programs are being cut
      out of K-12 schools - not to mention artschools themselves, which
      are increasingly becoming vocational feeds for the tech
      industries. I do think this plays into our inordinate fear of
      ebola, our magnification of crISIS in general, and our deep
      ignorance of conflict and violence (although we practice both with
      impunity). Comments appreciated, and thanks, Alan <br>
    </blockquote>
  </body>
</html>